The Job Narrative Summary

It is often helpful to begin your job narrative with a straightforward summary, or an overview of what you did. It typically consists of a string of items and helps the reader quickly understand what exactly you did. Here are examples:

Research databases and create surveys to analyze trends and identify opportunities for improving customer support strategies.

For this sign manufacturing company, prepared financial statements and supervised payroll, billing, and accounts receivable personnel.

Directly responsible for all phases of investment analyses, development, and management of properties.

Coordinated all aspects of the Early Childhood Special Education Program, including hiring and training of staff and support professionals, and the design and implementation of curriculum.

Supervised and trained a lending staff of four in credit and business development efforts.

Interviewed, counseled, and educated patients and families preceding and following open-heart surgery.

Even before learning the details in the rest of the job narrative, the reader has a good overview of what the person did. It is fine to start off with “Responsible for . . .” but don’t overuse it. Notice that only one of our examples used “responsible for . . .”

What To Call Your Employment Section

There are a variety of words and phrases you can use to head your employment section: Employment, Employment Experience, Work Experience, Professional Experience, Professional History, Employment History, Work History, and Experience are all good terms. Select the one the one that feels right for you.

If all of your work has been in one particular field, and you intend to stay in that field, use that term as your employment section heading. You could call it Healthcare Administration Experience, Automotive Experience, Engineering Experience, or Financial Administration Work History.

Dates

Dates should be used on nearly all resumes. If you have no time gaps between jobs or short gaps, you should usually use the months and years you started and ended. If you have long gaps, you can just use the years.

When to use month and year (example: 5/87–3/93):

  1. No gaps in employment.
  2. Short gaps of less than five months.
  3. One gap of more than five months, several years ago.

Some believe that omitting months can be interpreted as hiding something. On the other hand, long gaps between jobs can raise other concerns. With this in mind, decide what is best for you. Select one and move on. Neither will be a show stopper if the experience is conveyed as valuable.

Job Location

Your resume should indicate the city and state you actually work in, not the location of your company’s national headquarters. If you work out of your home, include your city as your location; if you live in a suburb, include either the name of the suburb or the more familiar name of the large city near you, which is usually the official name of the market you are serving.

Clarifying What Your Company Does

If you work for General Motors, General Electric, or Boeing, there is no need to explain the nature of your business. If your employer is Eastside Masonry Products, it is also unnecessary to elaborate because the company name explains its type of business. If you work for SLRC Corporation, though, you may want to explain what it is. Handle it this way:

SLRC, Inc., Boston, MA 1996-1999

Sales rep—For the second largest distributor of electronic components in the Northeast, increased sales over 20% each year.

Or

Sales rep for the Northeast’s second largest distributor of electronic

components. Increased sales over 20% each year.

Or

Sales rep—Increased sales over 20% each year for SLRC, the Northeast’s

second largest distributor of electronic components.

You can also use such phrases as these to explain what business your employers were in:

For this social service agency . . . For this social service agency providing help for the homeless . . .

Or

Managed a variety of key programs for this agency responsible for eliminating chemical hazards in the work place.

Directed all financial operations for this not for profit company. Supervised a nine-person technical team for this software development firm.

Scope Of The Job

The scope of a job includes such things as the products and services of the company, size of company in terms of gross sales, the size of your department in terms of people and dollar budget, the budget you personally work with, and the number of people supervised. Include the scope of the job to clarify your level of responsibility or any other key point. To describe the scope of a job you might say, “Managed all finance, accounting, and data processing functions for this $80 million manufacturer of outdoor equipment.” Or you might say, “Supervised a staff of four supervisors and managed a department budget of $1.2 million.”

How Much Detail and Space Should You Devote to Each Job?

Principles (not laws) to keep in mind:

  1. Describe your current or most recent position in the greatest detail as long as it is similar to the type of job you are seeking. Each preceding job will receive slightly less detail.
  2. If the job you held three positions ago is closest to what you’re seeking, devote the most detail to it.
  3. Early jobs and those unrelated to what you are looking for can usually be glossed over in two or three lines or handled as Previous Employment or Prior Employment. See page 60 for more on Prior Employment.

How Far Back Should Your Narratives Go?

Recent College Grads. Most college graduates drop their part-time and summer jobs within two to three years of graduating. Those who held part-time or full-time positions for several years while in college may want to keep those in the resume for a longer period. The basic principle is, include pre-graduation experience if it offers value to your candidacy. If you’re not ready to completely get rid of some earlier position, using a Prior Employment section may be appropriate. If your first job out of college was very short and it does not add to your credentials, consider leaving it off.

Those With 10+ Years Experience. The resume is your marketing tool in which you present only the information you consider positive and compelling. Consider omitting early and short-term positions if they might raise questions about you, questions that are better dealt with at the interview. In doing so, however, make sure you are not leaving obvious gaps between your education and employment or between different jobs. Omitting dates of graduation might be helpful when covering a gap between education and employment. Providing

only years (without months) in your dates of employment can usually provide sufficient flexibility when dealing with employment gaps.

Those with 10–20 years of experience should usually provide full job narratives going back at least ten years.

Current Job Is Less Relevant Than a Prior or Prior Jobs

Generally, it is wise to devote less space to a current, less relevant job, than a previous position more closely aligned with your employment objective.

Another option can be productive: you can separate your experience into two segments, calling one Related Experience and the other Additional Experience. Instead of Related Experience it could be given a name. For example, if a real estate agent wanted to return to the field of Training and Development, she would call the section Training and Development Experience rather than Related Experience or Relevant Experience.

The related experience section would come first and would generally have the greatest detail. Except for the fact that you have two employment sections, Related Experience and Additional Experience, it is a standard reverse chronological resume. Within each category you should list jobs in reverse chronological order and show the correct dates. Showing the information in this way makes it clear to the employer that even though you are using an atypical format, all jobs have been covered. More importantly, it means that the employer will read your relevant experience first. This strategy will be covered in detail in the chapter on the Clustered Resume.®

Avoid Long Sentences

A convincing job narrative uses a combination of short, medium, and longer sentences to make its points. A common mistake in resume writing is to cobble together all duties and responsibilities into one endless sentence separated only by a series of overworked semicolons. Check out the example below and ask yourself if it is something that would convince you to meet the writer.

Duties: Writing all local copy for top-rated contemporary radio station involving:

Dealing with a broad range of advertisers from fashion to food; supervising flow

of ad materials from sales through production to on-air status; communicating with advertising agencies re: national advertisers; voicing special news reports, ski reports and various commercials; and overall, maintaining efficient station continuity and copy excellence enhancing advertiser/station relations and decreasing commercial errors.

And this comes from a professional copywriter!

Quite a mouthful, isn’t it? Now review the version on the next page after a bit of editing.

Write all local ad copy for this top-rated contemporary radio station. Customers include a broad range of advertisers in the fashion and hospitality industries.

Manage flow of ad materials from sale through production and broadcast.

Communicate with advertising agencies regarding national advertisers. Appear as on-air talent in special news reports and perform voice over services for numerous commercials. Have significantly strengthened advertiser relations by improving copywriting, reducing on-air commercial errors, and making station operations more efficient.

Several Jobs Within One Company

It is no longer rare to have five or six changes in job title within one company in a short period of time. Frequently this is the result of promotions, lateral moves, and reorganizations. In many such cases most of the previous responsibilities were maintained, with newer ones being added with each new job title. To describe each position individually would be redundant and unnecessary. Any two jobs that were essentially the same, can be treated as one.

Multiple Similar Jobs

Many careers consist of a series of similar positions in which the duties and responsibilities were almost indistinguishable from each other. Real estate agent comes to mind. Writing three identical job narratives would be redundant and boring. If the experience in each agency was essentially identical, it can be combined into a single job narrative. Here are two options in handling this type of entry, both listing each agency in the header.

Both are preferable to multiple entries consisting of, “same duties as above.”

McKenzie Real Estate, Seattle, WA; ReMax Real Estate, Bellevue, WA; Cole Real Estate, Redmond, WA 1996–2004

real estate agent—Developed a strong real estate referral base by specializing in home listings throughout northern King County, selling homes ranging from $450,000 to $2.5 million. At each branch became either the number-one or number-two producing agent. Developed a reputation for holding deals together and getting full price for home sellers.

Or

McKenzie Real Estate, Seattle, WA ReMax Real Estate, Bellevue, WA Cole Real Estate, Redmond, WA

real estate agent, 1996–2004—Developed a strong real estate referral base by specializing in home listings throughout northern King County, selling homes ranging from $450,000 to $2.5 million. At each branch became either the number-one or number-two producing agent. Developed a reputation for holding deals together and getting full price for home sellers.

Similar positions in similar types of organizations can, at times, be significantly different to warrant their own job narratives. In real estate that might be an agent who has sold in diverse markets to diverse customers, representing residential properties at one and commercial properties at others. Or, serving as the onsite sales/leasing agent for a property developer. In this case, the most recent job narrative can serve to showcase the generic duties, skills, and successes shared by all positions such as the marketing, networking, negotiating, staging, problem solving, ad infinitum. The succeeding narratives need only define the differences (market, clients, properties, etc.) and cut to the accomplishments.

Emphasizing You Were Recruited

It never hurts to stress that you were recruited whether directly by the employer or through a headhunting firm. Begin your job narrative with, “Recruited by the president of XYZ . . .” If you had a specific mission or mandate, include it. “Recruited by the president of XYZ to turn around sales and improve quality.”

Including Volunteer Experience

Volunteer experience can often showcase skills you rarely or never were able to demonstrate in your paid positions. If it was substantial and relevant to your current career objective, include it in your employment history with its own job narrative. You can label it in the job title (“Volunteer Event Manager”) or in the opening line of the narrative (“In a volunteer capacity . . .”).

Overqualified?

Sometimes you will be attracted to a position where you sense you may be viewed as overqualified. If your title or responsibility level are significantly higher than the job you are seeking, you may want to tone down those responsibilities and be prepared to discuss it during an interview. If you appear to be overqualified the main thing you can do is convince the company that you really want the job and believe that you could do it well. For more on what to do if you are overqualified see Appendix B.

Gaps

Job seekers are typically ultra-sensitive regarding any perceived problems with their work history. This often includes concern over gaps in employment. Most gaps are non-issues and don’t merit much concern or thought.

Truth be told, gaps ain’t what they used to be. The past few decades have seen more and more people voluntarily take extended leaves between jobs. Paternity leave is now the norm in many companies and more and more male members of the species are opting for house husbanding.

One of our younger clients had a dream of circumnavigating the globe in a sailboat. Lo and behold, he somehow came into possession of a boat. He went to his boss and explained that he had decided to follow his dream. He did, however, offer to stay on as long as needed to find and train a replacement. He was as good as his word and the boss was so grateful by the way he had handled the situation, he provided a glowing letter of recommendation and an open offer of employment if there were an opening in the future.

Well, he never actually made it around the world, but far enough to say he had lived the dream. When he asked about how he should handle the gap when he interviewed, our advice was to share the experience with the employer. The caveat, of course, was that his dream was behind him now and it was time to get back to work. Clients with similar experiences have told us the typical responses of the interviewers was “I wish I could do that!”

Another client took nine months off work to hike the Pacific Crest trail, 2650 miles from Canada to Mexico. Hiking through the Cascade Mountains down into the Sierras is a huge undertaking. We described it briefly in the resume under the heading of sabbatical. His interviewers, to a person, expressed their admiration for the feat.

If you’ve been away from work for six months or longer, you may be asked about it with a question such as “why haven’t you been hired by now?”

So, what were you doing all that time?

Some folks fill in the space with consulting services. These include management, financial, marketing, and technical offerings. The beauty of consulting is that you need not have been doing it full-time or even a lot of time! Just as a freelance writer or musician is not always working. The risky part of presenting yourself as a consultant is that you will inevitably be asked to share information on your projects. As in any situation, best to be prepared with a few good stories and results. Also, your clients might be considered as your most recent “employers” and subject to reference checks and verification. So, make sure they are on board when it comes to being contacted.

Of course, eliminating months in your employment dates and including only the years will alleviate most of your concerns.

Gaps of One Year or More

Long gaps that occurred two or more jobs back can often be ignored—they’re old history. Interviewers often assume that women with gaps in their work history did so to care for their children. Those parents who were, in fact, parenting during this time can easily allude to this by including their PTA, scout leadership, and T-ball coaching activities in the Volunteer section of their resumes.

One client described his one year gap in his resume by calling it a special project. The project included major work on his house so it could be sold. He then moved from Massachusetts to Washington.

With our aging society, the care of older and infirm relatives can often take a bite out of our job search. If you have been providing such care in addition to your job search activities, feel free to list it. You may have been working at it full-time or an hour or two per day. In either case you could show that on your resume:

Home care provider for terminally ill relative 2007–2008 Full-time home care provider for a terminally ill relative 2007–2008

Other options include:

Independent travel to Asia and Africa 2006–2008

Personal travel 2004–2005

Adventure travel 2005–2006

Travels to Indonesia and Thailand 2006

Full-time parent and PTA volunteer at Robert Frost Elementary 1998–2008

Full-time parent 1995–2006

Home management 1993–2005

Family management 1997–2007

Independent study 2005–2006

Professional development 2000–2001

Personal growth and development 2001–2003

Student 1998–2004

Volunteer 2004–2006

Volunteer with Habitat for Humanity 2003–2005

Your task is to determine the best way to show that there was a reason you were not working during a certain period of time.

Temping

If you worked for a significant period of time through temporary agencies, it is generally best to simply mention the one you got the most assignments from. If you had a long-term assignment with one organization you could choose to list only that business and not the agency that placed you there.

If some of the organizations you provided temporary services for are well known, you might want to mention some of them.

Blaylock Temporary Services 2004–2007

office and administrative Services—Provided clerical services for local firms with assignments ranging from one to twelve weeks. Functions included project management, developing improved systems, desktop publishing, reception, bookkeeping, and collections. Worked for such firms as Merrill Lynch,

IBM, Nordstrom, State Farm Insurance, Matthews & Sons, and Jones & Jones

Construction. One of the most highly sought temps with Blaylock because of

ability to quickly learn existing systems and procedures.

Below is a section of a resume of a person seeking permanent employment in the human resources field. Much of her HR experience was gained as a temp. As she wanted emphasis on the longer term projects that were more HR oriented, she simply omitted the shorter and non-related assignments. Note below that by calling the section Long-Term Contract Services, she is telling the reader that only major projects have been included.

long-term ContraCt SerViCeS 1999–2006 Projects typically ranged from 6 to 15 months. Major projects:

regal insurance group—Employment Specialist

• Provided recruiting services for technical and administrative personnel, including

offer letters and reference verification.

  • Performed periodic EEO surveys and ensured all goals were met.
  • Researched and worked with Corporate Counsel in a training awareness program

for supervisors regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Sun microsystems—Employment Specialist/Recruiter

• Recruited qualified candidates for a hardware design program. Interfaced with

department managers and Corporate Relocation Services. Authorized and explained appropriate relocation benefits to managers.

  • Provided employee counseling and problem resolution.
  • Promoted, planned, and coordinated the Software Business System

personnel database, which significantly increased personnel data available to management.

  • Participated in the design of a redeployment plan.
  • Developed, implemented, and directed a Reward and Recognition program for a

500-person project, with the award budget totaling $150,000. Program was well received by management and employees.

unisys—Transition Team

• Initiated and facilitated employer relocation and outplacement services for

95 engineering and manufacturing people. Provided job search training, skills assessment, career counseling, and advocacy.

• Coordinated with 45 high-tech firms to arrange employment interviews both

locally and out-of-state. All employees successfully transitioned to other positions with Unisys or outside companies.

ibm—Employee Benefits Office

• Researched, interpreted, and communicated benefit-related issues to coworkers

and clients. Acted as liaison between employees and insurance companies to resolve claims.

• Worked with insurance companies to effectively introduce new programs to

employees. Assisted in new-hire orientation, 401(k), medical, vision, and dental programs.

bulletS VS. narratiVe FormatS

Last we heard, the proponents of bullet and narrative formats were tied in the fourth quarter.

One debate in the world of resume writing is whether job narratives are more effective using bulleted vs. paragraph formats. There are fairly strong arguments for both sides. Let’s take a look at both arguments and you determine which is a better option for you.

Bullets—The primary argument used to justify bullets is that it makes the resume easier and quicker to scan. This includes the so-called common wisdom that employers devote next to no time in reviewing it prior to making the decision on whether to keep or pitch it. Using that argument, the bullet version seems the stronger format.

Paragraphs—The argument for paragraphs runs like this: If the paragraphs are kept to 3–7 lines, they are actually easier to read than bullets because most of the text we read—books and newspapers—use paragraphs rather than bullets.

In reality, both bullets and paragraphs can work well. They can even be used in combination with each other. The key is to use them to their greatest effect.

Too many short bullets can lose the reader while overly-long ones can be clumsy and actually negate the benefit of using bullets in the first place.

Bulky paragraphs with few line spaces between them will make the document imposing and difficult to read. Eye appeal is important in a resume, but neither the bullet point nor paragraph format is the automatic favorite in the eye appeal competition.

The single biggest drawback usually associated with bullet point resumes is they tend to provide too little information. Because many job seekers are still convinced that employers want short resumes that can be fully reviewed in under 30 seconds, the job narratives tend to be extremely lacking in useful information. Bullet point resumes usually focus on listing duties and tend to be devoid of results. Those results that are included are usually hanging around without context, essentially compromising their value. Thus, even if they pass the initial scan, more in-depth review will find a dearth of useful and valuable information about the candidate. It is like a sprinter who might win the first leg of a marathon but has little left in the tank for the rest of the contest.

The problem with the paragraph resume is often just the opposite; it can be verbose and bloated and not likely to be read.

All things being equal, we favor the crisply written and visually appealing paragraph format. As art is in the eye of the beholder, there are an equal number of thoughtful and experienced resume professionals out there who would disagree. We encourage that because when all is said and done, the more solid information you get, the better choice you will make in what works for you.

Gary: I prefer the narrative format. When someone throws bullets at you . . . there is a tendency to duck out of the way. When a story is told . . . you become engaged . . . you pay attention. Stories with “happy endings” are particularly memorable and emotionally gratifying. Besides, 100 years of movies and 60 years of TV have trained us to ingest information as stories each with a beginning, middle, and ending. We expect these stories to entertain, interest, enthrall us. We expect dramatic conclusions!

eXamPleS: ParagraPhS VS bulletS

Below is an example of a well-written and visually attractive paragraph-oriented job narrative. There are no unnecessary words—everything included helps demonstrate quality and experience.

Store manager—7/06-Present. For the third largest music retailer in the Midwest, maintain profitable store operations. Supervise 16 employees and execute corporate sales programs. Evaluate inventory levels and order CDs that will sell in our market. Record and track store sales and overhead costs. Maximize retail sales through effective space allocation, merchandise presentation, and signage.

Recognized as a highly effective trainer and manager. Six of my trainees have been promoted to store manager. Exceeded the monthly revenue plan 23 of the last 24 months. Improved DVD sales 120% in the first year of a marketing program I developed and tested for the region. Increased store profitability by increasing sales 27% in 2007 and 24% in 2008, while at the same time decreasing labor costs 4% and reducing theft 65%.

The next example consists of the exact same content crammed into an over-large, single, imposing block of text. The above paragraph is clearly more inviting.

Employment

Store manager—7/06–Present. For the third largest music retailer in the Midwest, maintain profitable store operations. Supervise 16 employees and execute corporate sales programs. Evaluate inventory levels and order CDs that will sell in our market. Record and track store sales, payroll, and overhead costs. Maximize retail sales through effective space allocation, merchandise presentation, and signage. Recognized as a highly effective trainer and manager. Six of my trainees have been promoted to store manager. Exceeded the monthly revenue plan 23 of the last 24 months. Improved DVD sales 120% in the first year of a marketing program I developed and tested for the region. Increased store profitability by increasing sales 27% in 2007 and 24% in 2008, while at the same time decreasing labor costs 4% and reducing theft 65%.

Now let’s look at the same job narrative in a bullet point format.

Store manager—7/06–Present.

• For the third largest music retailer in the Midwest, maintain profitable store

operations.

  • Supervise 16 employees and execute corporate sales programs.
  • Evaluate inventory levels and order CDs that will sell in our market.
  • Record and track store sales, payroll, and overhead costs.
  • Maximize retail sales through effective space allocation, merchandise

presentation, and signage.

• Recognized as a highly effective trainer and manager. Six of my trainees have

been promoted to store manager.

  • Exceeded the monthly revenue plan 23 of the last 24 months.
  • Improved DVD sales 120% in the first year of a marketing program I developed

and tested for the region.

• Increased store profitability by increasing sales 27% in 2007 and 24% in 2008,

while at the same time decreasing labor costs 4% and reducing theft 65%.

The above bulleted example looks good and is easy to read. It provides valuable information with each bullet point being the right length to convey its message.

The following example includes most of the same information, but has been intentionally shortened to reflect how a typical bullet point resume reads. The job narrative is too short and simply does not give the reader enough useful information even though the key results have been maintained. It reads like a company job description, devoid of any personality.

Store manager—7/06–Present.

  • Maintain profitable store operations
  • Supervise 16 employees
  • Execute corporate sales programs
  • Evaluate inventory levels and order CDs
  • Record and track store sales and overhead costs
  • Maximize retail sales
  • Recognized as a highly effective trainer and manager
  • Exceeded the monthly revenue plan 23 of the last 24 months
  • Improved DVD sales 120%
  • Increased profitability by increasing sales 27% in 2007 and 24% in 2008

Now let’s look at the store manager narrative in a bullet format that many prefer. It begins with a paragraph of several lines that provides an overview of the position. Then it reverts to bullets. One of the benefits of this form of bullets is that it breaks up the left margin that otherwise would consist of nothing but bullets. See what you think, and then go to pages 209, 214, 218, 239 for an entire resume that uses this format.

Store manager—7/06–Present.

For the third largest music retailer in the Midwest, maintain profitable store operations. Supervise 16 employees and execute corporate sales programs. Evaluate inventory levels and order CDs that will sell in our market. Record and track store sales, payroll, and overhead costs.

• Maximize retail sales through effective space allocation, merchandise

presentation, and signage.

• Recognized as a highly effective trainer and manager. Six of my trainees have

been promoted to store manager.

  • Exceeded the monthly revenue plan 23 of the last 24 months.
  • Improved DVD sales 120% in the first year of a marketing program I developed

and tested for the region.

• Increased store profitability by increasing sales 27% in 2007 and 24% in 2008,

while at the same time decreasing labor costs 4% and reducing theft 65%.

From this you can see that both the paragraph format and the bullet format can work well. The quality of preparation and presentation of your job narratives will determine the success of your resume more than which format you select.

Shifting Careers or Industries

Any time you make a career or industry shift, you face disadvantages. By definition you’re lacking knowledge or experience that most of your competitors possess. Somehow you must overcome these deficits.

First, if you have not formally prepared for the transition through education or training, make the effort to thoroughly study the career field and industry. Read trade journals, magazines, and even textbooks. Do Internet searches and follow the appropriate links to informative sites.

Next, talk people in the field. They are the experts. and your potential network. Share your background to determine if it is a reasonable transition. Which organizations can best accommodate you? How do they see the industry? Expanding? Contracting?

When you are ready to make the move, get working on your resume. Your research has enabled you to identify those pieces of your background that will be best valued in the new industry. Learn the jargon. If a specific function in the new industry has a label different from what you have called it in the past . . . adapt.

As in any presentation, emphasize your strengths. Look for areas where your universal assets can be included such as problem-solving, initiative, decision-making, technical acuity, etc. Select the most compelling of these for the cover letters. You are presenting a package of strengths, not simply isolated job-specific qualifications. Many employers prefer quality people they can train, especially if you are at an entry point, as many career changers are.

Sometimes it works well to have a section labeled Highlights, where you can present key projects or experiences which used critical skills needed in your new field. Or you might want to consider alternative resume formats such as Functional (pages 117, 120, 121) or Clustered (pages 129–139) that might better illustrate this experience.

Important to Read
Resume Empower is unique in numerous ways, including its use of the printed page and the Internet. We’ve sought to provide our readers with valuale insight and information. Some resume issues, however, are very important to small numbers of people. We’ve tried to cover those points on our website. Go to Appendix B to see what we’re currently offering. We’ve listed numerous topics where you’ll find in-depth information. The number of topics will grow as readers ask about such topics or as we come to realize that information on a certain topic would be valuable. So, don’t rely solely on Appendix B. Go to www. careerempowering.com and click on “Books and articles by Tom Washington and Gary Kanter.” Once on that page you’ll quickly find topics not currently listed in Appendix B. If you have a topic that you believe should be addressed, email either of us (Gary at gkanter@yahoo.com and Tom at tomw@careerempowering.com) and we’ll seek to provide a response. Unfortunately we cannot promise to provide extensive answers to all questions, especially those which are more personal and may be unique to just one individual.

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